Spoilers for Marvel Knights X-Men #2

Here’s the rundown: The second kid on the Cerebro list for this town has the power to make memories come to life, hence why Wolverine fought Sabretooth, and the whole beginning of the issue has the X-Men fighting these manifestations until the girl finally calms down. Wolverine nearly kills her when one of her visions shows the murdered mutant that sent them on this hunt, his thinking supposedly being that it’s her memory of doing it, but also because he seems to be being subtly manipulated by the other girl, who has connections to mutant ecstasy pills and a corrupt sheriff. He backs off though, and instead they treat her out to dinner. They’re just trying to give her a warm meal, and buy some time to asses the situation, but she’s still a bit freaked out, and rightfully so.  She accepts the other girl’s offer of some of that crazy drug the rednecks have been selling, and her power goes wacko making people’s memories come to life all over the place, including a team of giant sentinels, leaving us to our cliffhanger.

Some good and some bad - 

It’s a very depressing story, this girl’s. She couldn’t control her power as a kid and kept constantly reminding her mother of her sordid past as a stripper. There’s nothing wrong with being a stripper in and of itself so it must have been a pretty bad time in her life, because her mom eventually kills herself, driving her dad into a drunken mess and ending with him finally just leaving.

When Wolverine is about to take that girl’s head off his claws are drawn comically long, like way longer than his forearms would anatomically allow them to be, and that’s always been a pet peeve of mine. The dialogue in the beginning, especially out of Wolverine, is just alarmingly bad. Wolverine sounds overly simple, yet overly verbose at the same time. You get typecast lines like “Sabretooth, I should have known it was you” but then he goes on this rant about disregard for human life. Maybe it’s not supposed to make any sense to show you’re having a conversation with something that’s not real, but it was just painful to read.

It’s a tough jam they’re in, trying to help kids who don’t want help, and Rogue points out some of the legal ethical type stuff, like can you just basically kidnap them and throw them in the school? But then what else do you do? The X-Men might have a bit of a hurtin’ reputation, but they have to be the mutant authority right? There is no other even remotely trustworthy group functioning as mutant child protective services.

I almost hope somehow those sentinels are real, I mean they can do real damage but it gives us basically the same cliffhanger all over again.

sentinels vs X-Men in Marvel Knights

Thumbs up – for their portrayal of the tough kind of spots the X-Men find themselves in, the trauma of growing up mutant, and for a nice slowly unraveling mystery.

I’m gonna say skip it though – it’s an awkward issue, and kind of a clumsy read, but hopefully it’ll look better in context of the full story.

 

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