Sunday 21st December 2014,
Comic Booked

Web Comics Wednesday! – HISTORY

Michael Wirth 08/31/2011 Reviews

Sometimes the easiest place to find inspiration for a story is to look into history. With so many different time periods to choose from, history can provide an endless font of tales and adventures. Today, we look at five web comics who chose to elaborate on different epochs in their own way.

If you’re new to this, here’s the scoop: Each Wednesday we showcase five indie web comics. Each will be categorized and will be judged by ART, STORY and APPEAL. This will give you an opportunity to support indie artists and the amazing work they do.

This weeks comics will explore HISTORY. Without further ado, let’s GO!:

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Next Town Over by Erin MehlosComic: Next Town Over
Story & Art:
Erin Mehlos
About: Next Town Over is a weekly paean to the western, with some steampunk and fantasy elements splashed in, updating at the stroke of midnight on Saturdays. From Eisner-nominated cartoonist Erin Mehlos, creator of Hell’s Corners, Next Town Over features some twists lurking a little deeper in the story, but it’s a bit early in the story to reveal too many of those just yet.

 

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Tales From The Middle Kingdom by KOADComic: Tales From The Middle Kingdom
Story & Art: KOAD
About: 
The name for China translates to “Middle Kingdom” in English. The term originated from the rather immodest ancient Chinese believe that China was the center of the civilized universe.

The current story is adapted from the classic novel Romance of the Three Kingdoms, which describes the military and political turmoil in China at the end of the Han Dynasty (169-290 AD), when the country was divided into three states.

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Machiavelli by Don MacDonaldComic: Machiavelli
Story & Art: Don MacDonald 
About: Niccolò Machiavelli, a mid-level diplomat in the fifteenth-century city of Florence, was, ironically, not adept at the office politics of city government. On the contrary, he served his city with distinction and it was only after a regime change forced him out of office, that he retired to his farm and wrote the political treatises for which he is widely known, The Prince and The Discourses. Machiavelli, a graphic novel based on the life of Niccolò Machiavelli, focuses on the disparity between the widely held perception of Machiavelli as an evil opportunist and the actual story of his life.

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Gastrophobia by David McGuireComic: Gastrophobia
Story & Art: David McGuire
About: Gastrophobia is the real-life adventures of an exiled Amazon warrior and her son living in Ancient Greece, roughly 3408 years ago. While our historical and archaeological records of the ancient era are dodgy at best and laughable at worst, Gastrophobia is no less historically accurate than other serious illustrated documentaries like Asterix or Groo.

 

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Story & Art: Larry Latham
About: First conceived as a CD-Rom game, Lovecraft Is Missing has had a wildly exciting past, having first been proposed to Dark Horse Comics, then DC Comics, and eventually almost materializing as a fully animated webseries. Finally settling into the comic format, Latham explains how Lovecraft Is Missing is planned as a six-issue series, which has drawn praise from Howard Chaykin, who has written for both Marvel and DC Comics.

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Want to share your favorite indie web or print comic? Feel free to comment below! I would love to add them to my list. Also feel free to visit my Facebook Wall to chat with these and other Indie comic creators.

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About The Author

Hailing from the armpit of America, New Jersey, Michael has been collecting comic books since the age of 10. Now, he deigns to keep his finger on the pulse of pop-culture, keeping up with every passing fad or iconic innovation, never losing sight of his comic book roots.

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