Way back in September 1985, in some long-forgotten bookstore, a little boy found an issue of Transformers #8 on the comic rack. Already a huge fan of the cartoon show and the toys, he begged and pleaded with his father to buy it for him and spent the car ride home devouring the 22-page tale of Ratchet and his secret weapon against Megatron: the Dinobots! He found it was very different compared to the cartoons. The story was grittier. The art was more detailed. In a word, the comic was better. He’d go on to own many more issues over the 80-issue run of Transformers before branching out to other Marvel Comics, and then other comic publishers.

Today, he’s writing an introductory piece for Comic Booked that you’re reading RIGHT NOW.

I’ve been collecting comics for years, crossed the fence between Marvel and DC many times, and dipped my fingers in dozens of the other publishers, too. When finances got tight and I had to give up collecting for long stretches, I’d still go down to the local bookstore and sit in their café reading trade paperbacks to keep up with my favorite heroes. (For the record, my favorites change every so often, but currently it’s the Flash and Iron Man.) I indulge in other geeky pursuits, of course – movies, books, cartoons, video games and roleplaying games – but it always comes back to comics for me.

Jane Espenson and R. B. LeMoyne Golden Apple

That’s why I’m so pleased to be writing for Comic Booked. Not only do I get a venue for indulging in my passion for amazing comics, I get to merge it with my other great love: writing. As an author of short stories and, soon, a kidlit novel, I look for the best storytellers that comics have to offer. While art is definitely a key factor in comic books, the words on the page are equally important, and the two have to strike a harmonious balance to work well. Both art and dialogue shoulder the burden of telling a seamless tale, and the best comics will convey just as much, if not more, in a single panel as a novel will in an entire page.

Then again, sometimes an issue of Superman and Darkseid battling it out over the fate of humanity doesn’t need to be analyzed down to its place in the character’s overall Hero’s Journey. Sometimes a comic is just there to be enjoyed for the sheer fun of it, cheesy superhero dialogue and all.

My name is R. B. LeMoyne, and I look forward to delving into the comic book multiverse with you here at Comic Booked!