The Darkness has hit 100 issues! I know, I can’t believe it either. I was sure the concept would’ve exhausted itself after 25! Granted, there was that time the series got canceled, then launched with a new Volume 2, but we all have our bumps. And given that early Image Comics had trouble sticking to a monthly schedule, it’s truly inspirational to see The Darkness, launched in 1996, averaging just under 6 issues a year.

UDON Entertainment
would like to remind you that they take prompt scheduling very seriously, so you can imagine how badly they feel about themselves for shipping comic books late for eleven years running now. Wait, that didn’t come out right.

This year’s Stan Lee Awards will be the Stan Leeviest ever. It’s going to be tough to find a Man or Woman of the Year, though, who is more Stan Leessential than last year’s winner of the award, Stan Lee.

Most artists breathed a sigh of relief when Marvel announced it was “making no policy statement” toward artist sketches at conventions. But one artist isn’t feeling so easy about the whole situation, Sean Gordon Murphy. And not without good reason: he and Marvel got into a dust-up over his Wolverine ABCs which led to a lot of legal wrangling. Yet his position isn’t what you might expect:

I don’t care if the industry standard is to keep making sketches/prints/sketchbooks, and I don’t care if people keep getting away with it. I don’t follow the “wink-wink industry rules” that exist in artists alley. I follow my own rules, and in this case I’m siding with copyright law. I’m siding with Marvel, DC, or any corporation who was the right to protect its interests. Marvel and DC should love that someone is making this statement, and out of his own free will…

I’m not trying to be provocative, only trying to help illustrate what creators need to do to protect themselves. Because I honestly believe that corporations don’t want to go after creators, because it makes them the bad guy. Which they’re often not.

My mistake was thinking that it was no big deal … because most people in comics don’t think it’s a big deal. But most people haven’t dealt with Marvel like I have, and that’s what fueled my involvement in this entire issue.

Finally, death in superhero comics is reversed so frequently that it rarely means much, but this particular death scene might actually stick, as it’s assigned to a character who’s more or less run his course commercially. If so, it’s a touching end for Eric O’Grady, the so-called “Irredeemable Ant-Man,” a Robert Kirkman creation who spent most of his life making Hank Pym, even at his most schizophrenic and spouse-abusing, seem like Mother Teresa by comparison.